Tag Archives: Original Art

Art In Boxes 2016 -Annual Holiday Art Gift Show-

ART IN BOXES  2016

On View: December 1, 2016 ~ February 1, 2017

AG Gallery is proud to announce the coming back of its annual holiday art exhibition “Art In Boxes 2016”. Please visit AG Gallery and find a perfect original artwork for a gift to someone special. This is the only exhibition AG Gallery presents that you can take the work with you before the exhibition closing day. We wish you all a happy warm holiday.  We look forward to seeing you at the gallery enjoying this one of the largest group exhibitions with many talented exciting artists from AG Gallery.

 

What is ART in BOXES?
“ART in BOXES” is a large group exhibition which shows/sells one of a kind artworks for ideas of the holiday gifts at affordable prices. AG Gallery exhibits about a hundred of art pieces every year by more than 30 artists from all over the world. The curator selected small to large art pieces which would be great for the holiday gifts. Artworks that are included in this show are paintings, sculptures, prints, collages, artist books, ceramics, potteries, greeting cards and postcards, accessory and jewels and many more handmade pieces. This is the great opportunity for that if people are looking for extraordinary holiday gifts this year or would like to give something special to someone special.

 

Participating Artists:  Hiromi Machida, Rica Tasaka, Naoko Saito, Sascha Mallon, Kyoko Imazu, Fumiha Tanaka, Danielle Kroll, Philippa Rice, Cat & Rabbit, Sirikul Pattachote, Michiko Shimada, Frank Parga, Victor-John Villanueva, Hanako Sakashita, Naoko Yoshizawa, Aya Kakeda, Koji Honda, Maria Montiel, Ken Brown, Noriko Tatsumi, Michiko Shimada, Kat Imperial, Ashware, and more…

This group exhibition is specially curated for your holiday gifting ideas by the gallery director Natsumi Kitano.

 

GALERY HOLIDAY HOURS:

General AG Gallery Hours are noon to 8pm

Between 12/19 ~ 12/23, the gallery will open from 11am – 8pm

On 12/24,  the gallery is open from 11am~6pm.

AG Gallery is closed on Christmas day, December 25th.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Artist Interview | Aya Kakeda

AG Gallery is pleased to announce an extension of our current Solo Exhibition “Miotsukushi” by Aya Kakeda. Thank you for all those who attended for the opening reception and already visited the show, Please make sure to visit us if you haven’t already.

Meanwhile below is an exclusive interview with Aya Kakeda, with some images of her original works still available at AG Gallery. Please enjoy!

Exhibition will be on view through November 12, 2016.

img_1780

~Interview with artist Aya Kakeda~

Q1-Please tell us a little bit about your background…

I was born and grew up in Tokyo, Japan. I moved to the United States when I was in my late teens; I lived in Florida, Georgia, and now live and work in Brooklyn, NY. 
My art education is in illustration, but while I was in school I started to be more interested in Fine Art.  Now I split my time being a illustrator, Fine artist, and educator. 

img_5709

splash2

Q2-What was the first work of art that you saw or experienced that you still remember today?

My grandmother was a Japanese Tea ceremony teacher. And I grew up surrounded by tea ceremony tools, ceramics, seasonal flowers, and seasonal Japanese paintings that decorate around the tea ceremony rooms.
Since they are for tea ceremony, the art or ceramic themselves are not necessary decorative or colorful; actually they were more in earthy tones had WabiSabi feelings to it, but they always had some twist or hidden playfulness to them which interested me.
Also, in every season Kimono maker would come to our house and show my grandmother rolls of fabrics.  I still remember the scene when the rolls of fabrics would fly through the air, filling the room, and for me it looked like a sea of patterns.  I think that image still sticks to my mind and till this day I love looking at patterns. My work also has a lot of patterns in it. 

shy2

Q3-Who were your earliest influencers of famous artists or creators?

As a child I was very much into monsters, ghosts, animals, and Folk stories.
Kuniyoshi (Ukiyoe Master) has a huge influence on me. I discovered his playful Ukiyoe that depicts animals as human. It’s quite humorous. And his monsters are not always very scary; they are very silly and I loved that about his monster work. 
Also growing up in Japan I was more into non-traditional art like Manga and Animation.
I always liked  Shigeo Mizuki, Osamu Tezuka, and Fujiko Fujio A.
Their world is twisted, dark, and full of monsters, but also humorous.
I think that’s my favorite mixer; dark creature world but humorous. 


img_5891

Q4-Please tell us about your work…

I like telling stories and creating my own whimsical world.  When I started out, I started by remembering my imaginary world that I had when I was little.  And now that world has been expanding over the years.  My world is mysterious and dark, sometimes with strange creatures but never serious; there is some sort of humor in it. I like the contrast of reality and imaginary, dark and light, cute and ugly, and that reflects in my art I think. 

Q5-What do you make?

Materials have been changing over the years also depending on the project. It varies from Printmaking, embroidery, painting, installation, now I’m very into making a ceramic sculptures. For this show it’s mostly paintings and ceramic sculptures. 

img_5897

Q6-What generally inspires or influences you to create your work?

I get very excited to see craft and fabrics from different parts of the world. For that reason, traveling and getting to know the different culture has been a huge influence on me. Every time I go somewhere I get inspired and can’t wait to go back to studio and create.  Also I get influenced by reading, watching cinema, seeing performance, and so on. 
And having coffee talking to friends also inspires me, I am luckily surrounded by many creative minds!

void

 

Q7-What is the main challenge for you when creating your work?

I try to challenge myself by using new materials and I love the process of making things, but I often end up with “ugly s***” and not one, but many many “ugly s***” and that’s frustrating sometimes to not get the result I want.  But it’s also the part of art making I like as well, experimenting and exploring new things. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q8-What are you currently working on?

I am currently working on a Ceramic series that I started this Summer. Part of them are exhibited at AG gallery right now!
I have been trying to combine the beautiful deep colors and textures of the ceramic glaze  and very artificial flat colors. My work usually has believable botanical backgrounds and mythical imaginary creatures, and I would like to push that in the material as well by mixing earth (clay and glaze that are made with minerals from earth) and artificial medium (plastic, resin, and house paint).

img_1707
Q9-Is there anything that people might not know about your work (or your medium) that you would like to share?
 
Continuing from the precious question. My new work has a combination of ceramic/glaze and resin/house paint. 
 
img_1691

Q10-What is your dream or goal as an artist in 3 years? 5 years?

Ceramic is still a new medium for me and I’m still learning about the medium and also how to show in the space. I would like to figure out how to mix my 2D works and sculpture also to create the whole complete world. So my future plan is to figure that out in the next year or so and make more art!  As a goal I would love to have a bigger body of work for exhibition. 

img_1694

 

Lastly, Do  you have any message to visitors for this exhibition? What we should check out / should not miss in this exhibition?

The past few years have been a transition for me moving from 2D to 3D and also finding a way to incorporate both mediums. So maybe visitors would be able to feel the transition and the new direction and hopefully that’s interesting for them to see. 

img_1777

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Things Are Actually Not Falling Apart by Sirikul Pattachote

 

SirikulPattachote16

Things Are Actually Not Falling Apart          Solo Exhibition by Sirikul Pattachote

Exhibition On View: May 16 – May 29, 2016                                                                          Opening Reception: Tuesday, May 17 | 6-8PM

In this exhibition we focus on finding peaceful unity within the laws of living a life through artist Sirikul Pattachote’s original watercolor paintings and drawings. Sirikul’s sensitive and delicately painted works are presented quietly, but the images of fresh living flowers and dying flowers in her works leave an intense visual impression.Through her still-life paintings of flowers that she picked for one of her closest lost family members and with her imagination, you will experience the meditative message, “things are actually not falling apart”.

Sirikul Pattachote is a Thailand-born New York artist who earned her BFA from Silipakorn University of Art and Design (Bangkok). Her artwork is inspired by nature, where she draws upon memories and the experiences of her surroundings in everyday life. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in her work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything. Sirikul has exhibited extensively in Southeast Asia and New York.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Artist Spotlight: HARIMOGURA

HARIMOGURA is an artist name of two artists Jin and Aya.

Together, they create fully hand crafted planters. They design, modeling and hand paint each planter, like a sculpture. Aya and Jin make different works. Jin is specialized in making industrial or house like shaped planters. Aya is specializing in animals.

This is very first time for them to bring their works to New York City and so that you can actually see their planters at our gallery this winter. You can also purchase their work at AG Gallery while the works are on view.

HArimogura Gallery WIndow

Handcrafted Planters by Harimogura at AG Show Window SpaceHARIMOGURA Art planter

 Jin & Aya
 ABOUT
 "HARIMOGURA is our artist name, and it means Echidna in English.
 Our small small planters are handmade. They are made of resin.
 Since it is so small, you can put it on the windowsill or desk.
 Even though it's so small, there is an enough presence.
 Each planter is a mixed art of the artistic object and little plants, that will produce a nice space.
 We have been working at a modeling company, and we have been always creating big things there. 
One day, we began to make stuffs by ourselves after work. It is a small modeling that can be placed anywhere.
 Also, we love nature.
 Art planter of the HARIMOGURA was created on the idea combining two different materials, resin and little plant.
 We created our unique style a long time ago under the name HARIMOGURA.
We love echidna as a peaceful animal. That’s why we want to spread our own style to the world."-Jin & Aya

Harimogura23Harimogura25  Harimogura26Harimogura04Harimogura22Harimogura06Harimogura24Harimogura21Harimogura19Harimogura20Harimogura17Harimogura15Harimogura18Harimogura14Harimogura16Harimogura13Harimogura09Harimogura12Harimogura10Harimogura11Harimogura08Harimogura07Harimogura01Harimogura02Harimogura03Harimogura05

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,