Tag Archives: oil painting

Half-Human|Natsumi Goldfish

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“HALF HUMAN”

November 3, 2018 ~ November 25, 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 3, 2018 6-8PM

AG Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition “Half Human” by a Japanese contemporary artist Natsumi Goldfish, opening on November 3, 2018.

Half-human figures in Natsumi Goldfish’s works are a metaphor of invisible borderlines between humans and other lives on the earth that separate and connect them from each other. In half-human figures, Natsumi Goldfish depicts human nature that is within individual human beings. Some human-ness in human beings are only seen when we are around nature and other lives, while such human nature might be subtle and minor in today’s our society, they are fundamental that initially defined humans from other lives. Natsumi Goldfish is interested in relationships that humans uniquely create between human beings, with nature, and with other lives. By making half human figures, Natsumi Goldfish tries to observe and rediscover and visualize the fundamental characteristics of human beings, and identify the borderline between humans and non-humans.

“We are always humans as a whole and as individuals. What is human being anyway? Is original human-ness of human being still present? It seems like humans are trying to erase some part of human-ness of individual human beings from our gene, in order to develop an ideal human society or human as a whole. If a human society is formed by the humans, by discarding or neglecting some basic human nature in our gene, we are also going to retrogress the society in the end, aren’t we? We are always half human since the moment when we are born, but perhaps the other half depends on each of us.”-Natsumi Goldfish

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Picking Flowers by Natsumi Goldfish, Oil on Canvas, 2017

Humans are highly social creatures and for centuries we have been making societies from the earliest band societies: hunter-and-gatherer societies, to agricultural societies, to contemporary societies today. Human existence has been sustained by the communal living. Human as a whole has developed and improved with technology, science, and economic systems, that have made our individual life easy and convenient. Individual humans, on the other hand, have not changed so much, nor improved the inner abilities or physical appearances in any drastic way since we have identified ourselves as human. As society developed, the roles and values of humans have changed. Humans have lost the opportunities to utilize such inborn qualities of human beings. What individual humans have been offering like imagination, curiosity, ideas, and craftsmanship seem to be not essential anymore to live. Without one of us, without you or me, the society will function and will improve no problem. The most of roles available in the society is some kind of consumers. Perhaps we should have never take for granted our ability to imagine, or to be human, even if the society that does everything for us. Human’s inner abilities and senses have been less practiced and stagnant. As an evidence, we used to do only things that we know how or used tools that we can make, but today we do everything we do not know. Our lives are convenient with the science and technology that offered by the society, but we do not know how to make them nor the fundamental structure of them. We know how to grow plants from seeds bought at a store but many of us do not know how to harvest seeds from plants. Many of us rely on medications to recover from sickness, but we cannot make nor know the detail ingredients of the white pills prescribed by physicians. Most of us know how to use a smart phone, but we cannot make one from scratch. We can turn on a light but we cannot make a lighting system or a light bulb, moreover the electricity is sold and supplied from other source. Just like humans have been modifying nature and other animals, I feel like humans societies are trying to modify some part of human nature. Something might be fading away from our gene even this moment.

ABOUT ARTIST
Natsumi Goldfish is a contemporary Japanese artist based in New York City. Goldfish grew up in the fringe of Tokyo, a place of between of all, where nature and urban culture, and many different elements coexisted. The environment inspired and educated her to believe in pluralism, or something close to the idea of being between and both. In 2011 she moved to the United States. In 2013, she received her B. A. in Art from Tyler School of Art. Goldfish primary works with oil painting. Her creation is based on her interest in conscious and unconscious human behaviors seen in the history as well as in her ordinary life.

Official Website: www.natsumigoldfish.com

 

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Messengers | A Duo Exhibition by Yuzuru Akimoto & You Jung Byun

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“MESSENGERS”
by Yuzuru Akimoto & You Jung Byun

March 17 – April 16, 2017

AG Gallery proudly presents Messengers, a two person exhibition by two brilliant artists: Yuzuru Akimoto and You Jung Byun. Please mark your calendar and save the date to visit AG Gallery’s new exhibition opening, and enjoy the tasteful storytelling evening with artworks and our artists. The title of this exhibition the title “Messengers” suggests two artists who create artworks with stories, and there are also other messengers, that are the characters which appear in their works.

Yuzuru Akimoto is a Japanese painter and a graphic designer based in Chiba, Japan. He was born in 1977 in Guam, and when he turned three years old, he moved with his parents back to his family’s home, to a suburb in Japan. He spent his youth away from the busyness of urban cities. When he was 19 years old, he moved to Tokyo. He was making Computer Graphics which was a sensational innovation at the time. Later when he was around 24 years old, he started to question the computer technology and graphic design industry he had been working for, that had been continuing to improve but seemed to not know a moment of rest, and thus he decided to go to Setsu Mode Art School to seek a different kind of art from computer graphic.

“When I paint, I try to be fully ready before standing in front of a canvas. I take notes of memories, smells, words, and feelings. I imagine those collected materials as a picture. Each picture has a reason or an event for why it was painted. My painting is a condensed image to keep the memory of the event. One of my goals for making such paintings is to paint a memory or an event as beautiful as or even more than the actual event itself. It is my practice to find beauty in anything that happens around me. Even a mysterious or ugly unpleasant event has its unique beauty if we try to find it. In order to discover that in my paintings I try to make them without too much narrative expression.” -Yuzuru Akimoto

You Jung Byun is a Korean artist, award-winning illustrator and author, You Jung Byun was born in Queens, New York. Byun grew up in America, Korea and Japan, and after getting her BFA from Hongik University in Korea she returned to New York. She received her Master’s degree of Fine Arts from the School of Visual Arts in New York. Her work is recognized for the detailed lines and soft nostalgic colors, imaginative landscapes (such as background images and patterns), and characters and portraits. Today, she lives and works in Brooklyn, New York; enjoying many chocolate nger biscuits and tea, and watching pigeons ghting over stale bagels. Her work has been recognized by various magazines, awards and competitions, including The New York Times, Nobrow, Pick Me Up London 2013, Communication Arts Magazine, Creative Quarterly, Ai-Ap, Society of Illustrators, Society of Illustration LA, & SCBWI (with winning both Grand Prize in Portfolio Award, and Tomie DePaola Award at a same time on 2010).

“I am interested in the mystery around us — like truth, lost memories, lost feelings, or secrets. When I draw I feel like I am reaching out to the air and try to grab the edge of something I miss. I think it’s based on my experience of moving around a lot as a child and have felt the ideal world is always behind me.”-You Jung Byun

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STRANGES LOOPS TONDOS by Marcus Pierce

Up Coming Exhibition

STRANGES LOOPS TONDOS by Marcus Pierce

Exhibition On View: May 3 – May 14 (~6pm), 2016

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About Artist

Marcus Pierce is a New York based artist Marcus Pierce has worked more than fifteen years creating both public and studio figurative art. He has been awarded grants from the Boise Department of Arts and History, Idaho Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Insight the Exhibition

In this exhibition we focus on the latest painting series by Marcus Pierce. He has been working on paradoxical paintings on circular canvas. His paintings’ paradoxical subjects and the canvas shapes make a unique balance or composition that we are not used to seeing in other artists paintings. In the exhibition, each painting is connected by the artist to another painting. His work may somewhat remind of you of the Belgian Surrealist artist, Rene Magritte.

“….. One of several reasons […why I am using the circular shape], is that despite these paintings being simple in appearance, I am using a conceptual structure that is paradoxical or that embodies circular seeming reasoning. The paintings are in relation to what cognitive scientist Douglas Hofstadter refers to as a Strange Loop, a recursive form that violates hierarchy, where as one perceives oneself as getting further and further from their starting point, he/she unexpectedly arrives at their starting point. […]” -Marcus Pierce

 

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